Bear garlic - a famous spring time cleanser, is amazing for cleaning the blood and treating cholesterol and high blood pressure. It also relieves stomach problems and protects you against colds, viruses and chronic diseases.

Wild bear garlic - it got its name due to the fact that is the first and most nutritious thing a bear can eat when it wakes up from its winter slumber, and it became a synonym with vitality and strength!
Usually the food that is available at a specific time of the year is filled with nutrients that we need at that moment. So, when Bear garlic comes in the spring, it offers a strong protection from colds and viruses, and cleans out our bodies from the stagnant winter build up - a perfect spring time (or any other time) cleanser :

Lowers blood pressure and cholesterol

Antioxidants

Digestive health

Protects against bacteria, viruses, fungi and chronic illnesses

Respiratory health

Skin health

Cancer protection

Lowers blood pressure and cholesterol

Bear garlic is widely known for its antibacterial, antibiotic and antiviral properties, and it contains vitamins A and C, calcium, iron, phosphorus, sodium and copper. Revered for its blood-cleansing properties, it is one of the oldest and most popular medicinal plants among animals and humans alike.

Studies have also shown that it helps reduce blood pressure, thereby reducing the risk of stroke, atherosclerosis and heart disease. Interestingly, although all types of garlic have these benefits, wild garlic is thought to be the most effective at lowering blood pressure.

Additionally, wild garlic is able to lower cholesterol levels, keeping your heart in good shape as you age.

Overall, it makes your blood thinner and easier to flow, cleaning it out of excess cholesterol and other build up that puts a strain on your heart and organs. Using it daily allows liver to get a rest from drugs and stabilizes blood pressure. Especially ideal for older people because it also improves bowel function.

Antioxidants

Free radicals are compounds that form in your body as a result of things like stress, pollution and a poor diet. Over time, the accumulation of free radicals can lead to cell damage and chronic disease. Antioxidants can help neutralize free radicals and have been shown to reduce the risk of conditions like heart disease, arthritis and cancer.

Bear garlic is especially high in antioxidants, which may account for its many other potent health benefits.

Digestive health

Antibacterial and anti-fungal compounds found in this wilder form of garlic can help to re-balance the bacterial flora in your gut, which helps to calm inflammation, bloating, cramping, constipation, and other stomach issues that may arise in our every day lives.

Protects against bacteria, viruses, fungi and chronic illnesses

We already mentioned the antibacterial effect of bear garlic on the digestive system, but it also has a broader range - it helps to fight off bodily infection caused by bacteria, virus, and fungi. Using the tincture or drinking it as tea can speed up the recovery from the common cold.

Its regular use can protect you from seasonal illnesses, everyday troubles and also from more serious chronic diseases.

Respiratory health

Bear garlic helps in the treatment of bronchitis, because it clears the airways, relieves breathing and decreases cough.

Skin health

Wild Garlic in the form of bath is ideal for everyone who suffers from problematic skin, skin inflammation , bruises and wounds, eczema and dermatitis, chronic skin disorders, and in acne.

Cancer protection

Wild garlic can help in protecting you from cancer in many ways. According to a 2018 study, it helps in inhibiting the formation of cancer-causing substances and also enhances DNA repair. Wild garlic also helps in inducing cancer cell death, thereby lowering your risk of suffering from cancer.

One more research paper has also shown that wild garlic also has the potential to kill skin cancer cells.

A 2015 study reveals that the presence of diallyl disulfide helps inhibit the proliferation of human cancer cell lines, including breast, prostate, lung, colon cancers, lymphomas, and neuroblastoma.

Dosage and preparation:
Tea - Pour a cup of boiled water over 1 to 2 teaspoons of Wild bear garlic. Let it steep for 5-10 minutes. Drink 3 times a day.
Tincture - 30 drops, 2 times a day.
Cooking/spice: Wild bear garlic is also used as a spice - it should be added after the end of the thermal treatment of the meal (after frying, cooking), to prevent the aromatic medicines to evaporate. Unlike onion, the smell has a distinctive odor only when it is eaten. Most people use this garlic as a substitute or complement to normal garlic or onions in a dish. While the flavor may be slightly milder than a sliced up garlic clove, it can still make an impact in any meal. The leaves are often sliced to mimic chives or green onions, while the small bulbs can be minced or added to a stir-fry for an extra kick of flavor. You can add them to soups, stews, and curries, or even sprinkle ground-up wild garlic in salads and marinades for chicken and beef dishes.

The taste: Obviously, wild garlic tastes like garlic. But it differs from the more common cloves as it is more mellow and has a distinct grassy flavor. The raw leaves have a strong pungent smell, but taste delicate and sweet.

Precaution: People with known sensitivities to garlic, onions, leeks, and shallots should avoid taking bear's garlic. Breastfeeding women, children, and expectant mothers are likewise discouraged from its use due to a lack of clinical testing across these demographics.

Bear's garlic is a blood-thinning herb that increases the likelihood of bleeding when taken with warfarin or other anticoagulant drugs.

Disclaimer: Information on this website is based on research from the internet, books, articles and studies and/or companies selling herbs online. Statements in this website have not necessarily been evaluated and should not be considered as medical advice. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. for diagnosis or treatment consult your physician.Use herbs in moderation and watch for allergic reactions.If you are taking any other medication, are pregnant, breast feeding or suffering from a medical condition and/or are at all concerned about any of the advice or ingredients consult your doctor before taking the herbs.Remember that diet, exercise and relaxation are equally important to your health.

Wild Garlic is commonly known as Ramsons, bear’s garlic, buckrams, wild garlic, broad-leaved garlic, wood garlic, bear leek, gipsy onion, hog’s garlic, and wild leek.

It is a part of the large Amaryllidaceae family, represented by 59 genera and over 850 species all over the world. As a member of the Allium genus, bear’s garlic is closely related to herbs like onion (Allium cepa), garlic (Allium sativum) leek (Allium ampeloprasum), and chive (Allium schoenoprasum).

Its botanical name, Allium ursinum, is derived from the Latin ursus, meaning bear. As legend would have it, bear's garlic was named for its apparent attractiveness to brown bears living in the plant's native region of northern Europe. Because it was often the first source of food available to them after their winter hibernation, the delicious herb is believed to have restored their vitality and strength. Revered for its blood-cleansing properties, bear's garlic is one of the oldest and most popular medicinal herbs among animals and humans alike.

The plant is native to damp shaded woods in Europe and northern Asia. Wild garlic is an attractive spring-flowering perennial which may be grown for both ornamental and culinary uses.

Bear’s garlic (Wild Garlic) boasts a very long history of use. The 1st-century Greek botanist Pedanius Dioscorides stated it in his five-volume herbal encyclopedia, describing its effectiveness for the cleansing and detoxification of the body. During the middle Ages, King Charlemagne of present-day France classified the plant in his Capitulare de Villis imperialibis, a guide that highlighted the medicinal properties of common herbs.

In 1992, bear’s garlic was named Plant of the Year by the Society for the Protection and Investigation of European Flora. Although easily overshadowed by its more lucrative relatives, bear’s garlic still holds the same wonderful health benefits that initially earned it the esteemed title. Today it is found in several parts of the world due to its wonderful health promoting benefits and amazing addition to different cuisines.

  • Extraction Ratio : 1/4
  • Ingredients: Organic grain alcohol, distilled water,and organic herb.
  • Alcohol Volume: 30%
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ANCIENT TRADITIONS FOR MODERN HEALING