Like with most herbal medicines, preparation and dosage of Meadowsweet is a very simple procedure. Bellow you can find the exact dosages and preparations methods.

Strong Antioxidant Properties

Meadowsweet highlights an array of antioxidants that promote overall health. Antioxidants can greatly reduce the risk of acquiring serious illnesses including cancer and progressive degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

The antioxidants present in meadowsweet can help reverse free radical damage and protects you from oxidative stress, which is frequently associated with cell mutations and accelerated cellular breakdown.

Meadowsweet is a Sweat Inducer

Meadowsweet is a soothing diaphoretic. It encourages circulation and opens your pores to release heat out of the body. It is especially recommended for those who may have fever but finding it difficult to sweat and cool the body. Sweat is a natural overheating control mechanism that the body uses to cool itself.

Skin benefits

It is a natural astringent that helps enhance your skin’s appearance by tightening pores and eliminating dirt and excess sebum. Meadowsweet contains salicylic acid, which helps remove pimple-causing bacteria and makeup residue, and can hasten drying up of acne.

The salicylic acid present in meadowsweet serves as a disinfectant that can effectively treat various skin conditions such as acne, eczema, and psoriasis.

Prevents Premature Skin Aging

Meadowsweet’s wealth of antioxidants also prevents photo-oxidative damage that may lead to premature aging of the skin such as appearance of age spots, fine lines, wrinkles, etc. Photo-oxidative damage is that caused by excessive UV exposure, such as being in the sun for long periods each day.

Can Help Cures Colds

It has been used in traditional medicine for centuries in treating colds and other associated symptoms. The analgesic as well as anti-inflammatory properties of Meadowsweet makes it an effective antidote. The roots of the herb can also be used to address certain respiratory ailments, which include coughing, sore throats, shortness of breath, and can also function as a mucolytic (breaks down mucus and removes it).

Promotes Digestive Health

As a digestive aid, the Meadowsweet herb is hard to beat. It relieves acid indigestion by soothing and protecting the mucous membranes of the stomach lining and digestive tract.

Studies have also revealed that meadowsweet can encourage faster healing of chronic ulcers as well as prevent lesions from developing within the stomach. Meadowsweet is also used to remedy gastritis, heartburn and hyperacidity. In addition, it provides anti-inflammatory effects due to its salicylate content, which is useful in treating diarrhea in children. Meadowsweet tastes pleasant, which makes it a good choice for little children.

Moreover, it also shows potential in inhibiting the growth of H. pylori bacteria. Many people have H. pylori living inside them, and though it is normal for the most part, this bacterium is the root of countless digestive ailments such as ulcers and gas. It also increases your risk of acquiring stomach cancer.

A strong decoction made from boiled meadowsweet roots can help you get rid of ulcers.

Analgesic Properties

It is suitable for relieving pain, particularly pain with a pounding sensation in a fixed location. The herb’s ability to alleviate pain is due to its salicylic acid content.

Salicylic acid is also the main active compound present in aspirin. However, meadowsweet is often better than aspirin because of the tannins present in meadowsweet. Tannins protect the stomach and intestines; on the other hand, aspirin has no tannins and tends to frequently result in stomach discomfort as a side effect.

Likewise, it is well suited to headaches as it provides a cooling effect while also promoting circulation.

Anti-inflammatory Properties

It has a gentle astringency due to its salicylic acid content, which is effective against inflammation. Salicylic acid is commonly derived from Willow, but other chemical constituents of the meadowsweet herb make it easier on the stomach’s lining.

Its salicylic content is beneficial in reducing inflammation in joints, ar**thritis, and gout while its analgesic properties alleviate pain**.

It is a Diuretic

Swelling from excessive accumulation of fluids in cells and tissues is called edema. Although edema may vanish on its own, there are some instances where you need diuretics.

Taken as hot tea, meadowsweet is an effective diuretic. Diuretics help in management of certain conditions such as edema and high blood pressure. Drinking meadowsweet tea helps your body eliminate sodium and excess water; thus, reducing the amount of fluid flowing through your blood vessels. This in turn minimizes the pressure on your vessel walls.

It is also beneficial for individuals with kidneys problems in which their kidneys can no longer filter potassium, as it speeds up water elimination.

Anti-bacterial Properties

Modern studies have shown that it is effective against bacterial infections to a large degree. According to researchers, meadowsweet combats harmful infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, Proteus vulgaris, Pylori and Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria.

Helps Fortify Your Immune System

All parts of it’s herb contain significant amounts of phenolic compounds such as the newly discovered flavonoid, ulmarioside. This type of flavonoid is unique to meadowsweet. Recent studies have demonstrated how ethyl acetate extracts show potential in inhibiting T-cell proliferation as well as inhibiting the production of free radicals. This explains the efficacy of the meadowsweet herb in treating inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Preparation:Put a teaspoon of meadowsweet into a 200ml cup of boiled water.Cover it and let it steep for 10 minutes.Strain and drink a cup 2-3 times per day.

FDA Disclaimer: These statements and products have not been evaluated by the FDA. They are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or condition. If you have a health concern or condition, consult a physician. Always consult a medical doctor before modifying your diet, using any new product, drug, supplement, or doing any new exercises.

Meadowsweet has a long and distinguished history of medicinal use and is mentioned in some of the most famous literary works of the middle ages. Meadowsweet was one of the three herbs held to be most sacred by the Celtic druids and was historically used to flavour mead – hence its folk name “mead wort”.

Meadowsweet was a celebrated herb in Celtic times, representing the Flowerbride, otherwise known as "Blodeuwedd" - the maiden aspect of the triple goddess.

This gentle flower was used to attract love, peace and happiness and was especially popular in love spells and potions. Adding this flower to a bridal bouquet was thought to bring joy and blessings to the bride!

Also enjoying a long history as a strewing herb, Meadowsweet's flowery, astringent properties made it an excellent choice for dwellings, serving as an insect repellent as well as a disinfectant.

In 1838 an Italian professor, Rafaele Piria, produced salicylic acid from the flower buds of Meadowsweet. In 1897 Felix Hoffmann, working for the German drug company Bayer, synthesised salicin based on the study of meadowsweet which was better tolerated by the stomach lining. Bayer named the new drug aspirin, derived from an old botanical name for meadowsweet: Spiraea ulmaria. This in turn gave us the important class of Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), still widely used today.

Anybody who has ever seen this beautiful plant growing wild will know exactly why it is also referred to as the Queen of the Meadow. The plant with its brilliant white flowers typically dominates the meadow wherever it grows.

The green parts of the plant are aromatically fragrant with a scent similar to almonds and in the past, the plant was used to expel unpleasant odors from homes and churches.

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ANCIENT TRADITIONS FOR MODERN HEALING