Echinacea is a popular herb commonly used to help combat flu, cold, urinary and respiratory tract infections, slow-healing wounds and to encourage the immune system.

Echinacea is one of those very well known herbs that can overwhelm you with the sheer number of benefits. It is the best sold herbal supplement in the USA, and for a good reason! Why the surging popularity in this magnificently attractive flower? Because echinacea benefits our health and well-being like few plants on the planet. Well researched and documented, here are the main benefits:

Immune System

Anti-cancer activity

Alleviates Pain

Respiratory health

Laxative

Anti-Inflammatory

Anxiety and Mental health

Lowers blood pressure

Lowers Blood sugar

Skin health

Fights Infections

Immune System

Echinacea has long been esteemed as a powerful immune system stimulator providing significant therapeutic value. It is perhaps most famous for its ability to cut the chances of catching the common cold by up to 58% and in reducing its duration by 1 – 2 days.

White blood cells and spleen cells increase after using Echinacea and the core body temperature rises. A higher body temperature speeds up the workings of disease-fighting cells and immune responses increase – this effect resulting in a double attack against disease-causing germs and viruses.

Echinacea also contains a compound called echinacein, which can help against bacterial and viral infections. According to a study in Pharmaceutical Biology, Echinacea exhibited antimicrobial properties and is effective against 15 different pathogenic bacteria and two pathogenic fungi.

Anti-cancer activity

Fascinating research about echinacea benefits regarding brain cancer has been published by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study concluded that Echinacea extracts slowed the growth of malevolent tumor cells, blocking the cancer’s ability to spread.

Additionally, since echinacea contains antioxidants it can help repair your cells. Antioxidants destroy the toxins (free radicals) that age and damage the cells in our body prematurely.
Because of the antioxidants in Echinacea, drinking Echinacea tincture or taking a high-quality supplement can contribute to healthy cell growth in your body.
This relieves another issue since cancer treatments tend to weaken the immune system and kill off some of our healthy cells, so drinking Echinacea may help to counter some of those side effects.

Alleviates Pain

Echinacea’s history began when it was used by the Great Plains Indians as a painkiller. It’s an especially effective natural pain reliever for the following types:

  • Pain in the bowels
  • Pain associated with headaches
  • Pain associated with HSV (herpes)
  • Pain associated with gonorrhea
  • Pain associated with measles
  • Snake bites
  • Sore throats
  • Stomach ache
  • Tonsillitis
  • Toothache

Some common ways to use Echinacea to combat pain is to drink it as a tea, or even make a paste out of the dried herb and rub it directly on the area that is affected.

Respiratory health

Because of its immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory effects, echinacea can be used to relieve the following upper respiratory symptoms:

  • Acute sinusitis
  • All flu’s
  • Asthma
  • Common cold
  • Croup
  • Diphtheria
  • Inflammation
  • Strep throat
  • Tuberculosis
  • Whooping cough

Laxative

Like many herbs, echinacea is particularly healing for the stomach and the entire gastrointestinal tract. According to Medical Herbalism, for example, echinacea can be used as a mild natural laxative to provide natural constipation relief and as a calming agent.

Drinking the herbal tea is especially effective to help with this issue. For more chronic conditions, a cup of tea every day can help loosen the bowels — whereas 2–3 cups per day can help with sudden bouts. However, be sure not to overuse echinacea, keeping watch to limit your tea to two cups a day max when using it for a longer period.

Anti-Inflammatory

Arguably the number one killer worldwide, inflammation is at the root of most diseases. Various factors — including stress, toxins in our food and poor sleep — all contribute heavily to our bodies. Thankfully, as explained by the University of British Columbia, regular echinacea consumption can effectively reverse and alleviate various types of inflammation.

It’s a good idea for people who struggle with conditions that are caused or worsened by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, ulcers, Crohn’s disease, and many more to regularly consume this plant.

Echinacea’s ability to increase hyaluronic acid production also makes it a great herb for cases of ligament, cartilage or joint injury and arthritis. When joints are damaged either by injuries or by the inflammatory processes of arthritis, they need hyaluronic acid to repair effectively. Echinacea comes to the rescue by stimulating the cells that make cartilage and repairing those painful joints and ligaments.

Anxiety and Mental health

Echinacea can be an excellent herb for those that battle with anxiety.
It helps regulate the synapses that aid communication between your body and brain. While it can’t turn off the “fear reflex” that people who have anxiety attacks experience, it can limit the physical effects of your fears and help you to feel calmer.

Additionally, Echinacea is the recommended plant to help with specific problems related to ADD/ADHD, and it is considered one of the natural remedies for ADHD.
Both adults and children suffering from ADD/ADHD have a higher-than-normal chance of experiencing emotional disturbances, especially:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Social phobias

Again, dosage is key. It’s recommended to only take 20 drops/2 cups at a time and no more. In fact, taking more than that can actually cancel out the echinacea benefits that relieve anxiety.

Lowers blood pressure

With its high amounts of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compounds, echinacea helps lower blood pressure levels. Anxiety and stress also play an important in high blood pressure, so the effects of Echinacea contribute to controlling it in various ways.

Lowers Blood sugar

The antioxidant properties in Echinacea purpurea are unique. A 2017 study showed that Echinacea in your bloodstream can help keep your blood sugar from spiking if you’re diabetic or prediabetic. It can also keep your blood sugar from plummeting if you are hypoglycemic. It certainly isn’t a replacement for insulin therapy or other diabetes treatments, but drinking Echinacea tea or tincture is a great way that you can naturally help control your blood sugar levels.

Skin health

Echinacea benefits the skin superbly. In a paper prepared by Armando González Stuart, PhD, about herbal safety, it describes how echinacea has been used by various Native American tribes to treat:

  • Poisonous bites
  • Eczema
  • Inflammatory skin conditions
  • Psoriasis
  • Snake bite
  • Skin infections
  • Stings
  • Wound healing

It can also be used to help the healing of wounds, regenerate skin and keep it healthy and young!

Fights Infection

Echinacea is also a fantastic remedy for a whole slew of infections. According to the NIH, taking echinacea and applying a medicated cream to the skin can lower the rate of reoccurring vaginal infections by to 16 percent, compared to simply taking the medicine alone. It’s also known to help with:

  • Bloodstream infections
  • Genital herpes
  • Gum disease
  • Malaria
  • Syphilis
  • Typhoid
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Vaginal yeast infections

Dosage and preparation:
Tea - Pour a cup of boiled water over 1 to 2 teaspoons of echinacea tea. Let it steep for 5-10 minutes. Drink 3 times a day.
Tincture - 20 to 30 drops, 3 times a day.
Poultice/Compress - Take 1-2 tablespoons (or as much as it is needed to cover the affected area) of echinacea, add a few drops of hot water and mix into a paste. Apply the paste on the desired area, cover it with a gauze and let stay for at least one hour, or overnight.

The taste: The taste of echinacea tea is often described as tongue-tingling. In fact, some herbal product makers regard this quality as evidence of the herb's effectiveness. Echinacea is commonly combined with mint or with other ingredients such as lemon balm to make a more pleasant-tasting tea and boosting the medicinal properties.

Precaution: Echinacea is essentially nontoxic when taken orally. People should not take Echinacea without consulting a herbal practitioner if they have an autoimmune illness, such as lupus or multiple sclerosis. Those who are allergic to flowers of the daisy family should take echinacea with caution.

Disclaimer: Information on this website is based on research from the internet, books, articles and studies and/or companies selling herbs online. Statements in this website have not necessarily been evaluated and should not be considered as medical advice. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. for diagnosis or treatment consult your physician.Use herbs in moderation and watch for allergic reactions.If you are taking any other medication, are pregnant, breast feeding or suffering from a medical condition and/or are at all concerned about any of the advice or ingredients consult your doctor before taking the herbs.Remember that diet, exercise and relaxation are equally important to your health..

Discovered by the Great Plains Indian tribes, Echinacea has been used as an effective herbal remedy for over 400 years.
It was the primary medicine of the North American Indians, who used root poultices for wounds, bites, stings, and snakebites. They gargled with it for toothache and sore gums, and drank echinacea teas for colds, smallpox, measles, mumps, and arthritis.
The Kiowa and Cheyenne used it for sore throats, the Pawnee for headaches, whilst the Lakota found it to be an excellent painkiller – all of these symptoms being prevalent in the common cold.

Although it was adopted by settlers, it remained a folk remedy until a medicine containing Echinacea as a secret ingredient was patented by Dr H C F Meyer as a blood purifier, and the ultimate cure for rattlesnake bites. Whilst this was a tall claim, Echinacea went on to be accepted by the North American Herbalists of the 1900s for many of the same properties it had been used for in traditional Native medicine.

Most people don’t realize that the chemicals contained in the root differ significantly from those in the upper part of the plant. If we analyze the roots, we can see that they have high concentrations of essential oils, while the parts that grow above the soil tend to contain more polysaccharides that are known to trigger immune function. Echinacea extract is essentially a tincture from this upper part of the plant.

The University of Maryland Medical Center also reports that the portion of the plant that grows above ground is the most effective. Interestingly, in Germany, dietary herbs are regulated by the government, and above ground parts of the Echinacea purpurea species are actually approved as natural remedies for urinary tract infections, upper respiratory tract infections, colds, and slow-healing wounds.

The notable benefits of echinacea tincture come from its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties. It’s also identified as an immune-strengthening agent, fights the flu, helps control blood sugar, potentially reduces the risk of breast cancer, helps manage anxiety and lowers blood pressure.

Echinacea, commonly known as the pale purple coneflower has become a popular plant to grow. Today, it is a favorite of gardeners and butterfly enthusiasts mostly due to its unusually beautiful purple flowers (hence the Latin name - Echinacea purpurea). The attractive flower that resembles daisies with mounded heads and rose, pink or purple petals grows on strong stems far above the foliage.

Common names: Black Sampson, Narrow-leafed purple coneflower, Rudbeckia, Sampson Root, Snakeroot, Sonnenhut.

  • Extraction Ratio : 1/4
  • Ingredients: Organic grain alcohol, distilled water,and organic herb.
  • Alcohol Volume: 30%
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ANCIENT TRADITIONS FOR MODERN HEALING