Dill seeds are used for any kind of digestive problem and they are amazing for new mothers and babies - they help milk production and soothe baby stomach problems. They are also helpful with respiratory issues and keep your bones healthy and strong!

Dill is mostly known as a vital ingredient of dill pickles, but this plant has a lot more to offer, including the not very well known seeds.
These tiny flavorful seeds hold a great medicinal potential and have been widely used in Indian, Mediterranean and Scandinavian kitchens and for a good reason! Check out all the benefits and you'll see why Dill seeds are a great addition to your kitchen and medicine cabinet:

Digestive health

Bone Health

Mom & Baby health

Stress & Insomnia

Calms Hiccups

Boosts Immunity

Respiratory Issues

Prevents Cancer

Beats bad breath

Digestive health

Dill itself is an appetizer and is, therefore, extensively used in culinary applications. It is a carminative, meaning that it can help to calm and relieve intestinal problems, soothe heartburn, ease colic and gas . The essential oils present in it stimulate the release of bile and digestive juices to break down your food into nutrients. These oils also stimulate the peristaltic motion of the intestine, easing the passage of bowel movements and relieving constipation.

Dill also has antibiotic properties, so it will aid in killing off any foreign organisms within your body and help with diarrhea problems.

Bone Health

Dill seeds have a high calcium content - just a tablespoon of dill seeds contains as much calcium as one-third of a glass of milk. This makes an excellent source of calcium for vegans and people who are allergic to dairy, and also protects you from bone loss and osteoporosis. These problems affect millions of people each year, and calcium, along with other essential minerals, is a key component in the proper growth and development of bones and the repair of injured bones as well.

Mom & Baby health

You might consider adding a container of Dill seeds to the gift you may give to a new mom, as a weak tea made from dill seeds and water can help ease colic as well as get rid of hiccups and promote sleep for infants. Dill also promotes lactation in nursing moms.

Stress & Insomnia

The essential oils in Dill seeds are quite unusual as they are both stimulating and sedative at the same time. The B vitamins and flavonoids stimulate certain enzymes and hormones which ultimately help you to relax. So enjoy a cup of dill and chamomile tea and you’ll quickly drift off to dreamland.

Calms Hiccups

Hiccups occur for various reasons, but primarily they occur due to trapped gas and its repeated upward movement through the food pipe. The second cause is due to certain allergies, hypersensitivity, hyperactivity, and nervous malfunctioning. Dill can help in these situations. As a carminative, it helps the expulsion of gases and also reduces gas formation; while as a sedative, dill helps to calm down hiccups due to allergies, hyperactivity, or nervous disorders.

Boosts Immunity

Dill seed has long been associated with antimicrobial activity. It prevents a number of microbial infections throughout the body as well as the infections that may result in open wounds or small cuts on the skin.

Respiratory Issues

Compounds called monoterpenes in the essential oils of Dill seeds help to clear up congestion and can also help tame allergies.

Prevents Cancer

Let’s turn our attention to the monoterpenes we 've just mentioned. Monoterpenes are chemopreventive, and since they are stimulating in nature, they activate the secretion of an enzyme called glutathione-S-transferase (the radical glutathione is an effective antioxidant) which is very effective in neutralizing carcinogens. It is particularly effective at neutralizing cyano- and benzo- derivatives and free radicals, thereby protecting the body from cancer. The other antioxidants in the essential oils of dill also contribute to cancer prevention.

Beats bad breath

Due to its carminative properties, dill seeds are also great at beating bad breath. Not only does it help change the smell of your breath but also helps better your digestion, solving bad breath from the root.

Dosage and preparation:
Tea - Pour a cup of boiled water over 1 to 2 teaspoons of Dill seeds. Let it steep for 5-10 minutes. Drink 3 times a day.
Tincture - 20 to 30 drops, 3 times a day.
Cooking: Dill seeds are widely used in the kitchen - you can add them whole to any food you're making, like soups, sauces, jellies, salads etc. They add aroma but don't change the flavor of the food too much, while adding a variety of benefits!Poultice/Compress - Used mostly for headaches, pains and sprains. Take 1-2 tablespoons (or as much as it is needed to cover the affected area) of Dill seeds, add a few drops of hot water and mix into a paste. Apply the paste on the painful area, cover it with a gauze and let stay for at least one hour, or overnight.

The taste: Dill seeds have a similar taste to the dill leaves, but more spice-like. Sometimes compared to caraway seeds or anise, they add a hint of freshness and aroma to your tea or food.

Precaution: Dill is considered safe when consumed as a food and as a medicine. It is stated however that over dosage may worsen gastritis and cause a burning sensation in the body.

Disclaimer: Information on this website is based on research from the internet, books, articles and studies and/or companies selling herbs online. Statements in this website have not necessarily been evaluated and should not be considered as medical advice. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. for diagnosis or treatment consult your physician.Use herbs in moderation and watch for allergic reactions.If you are taking any other medication, are pregnant, breast feeding or suffering from a medical condition and/or are at all concerned about any of the advice or ingredients consult your doctor before taking the herbs.Remember that diet, exercise and relaxation are equally important to your health..

Dill, scientifically known as Anethum Graveolens, has been used for culinary and medicinal purposes for hundreds of years. Apart from giving a strong, tangy, appetizing flavor and taste, it has many medicinal properties, which mainly come from certain compounds called monoterpenes, as well as flavonoids, minerals, and certain amino acids.

Dill is used in a number of soups and fish dishes within many countries around the world including Russia, Sweden, Thailand, Laos, Hungary and Vietnam. It’s of course a staple in making dill pickles, and also tastes great in herb breads. You can add it to dips, sauces and salads for a huge nutritional boost.

Dill can be a perennial or annual herb, depending on where it is cultivated in the world. It can be used dry as a topping for a number of meals, but it is also used as an ingredient in many meals. For herbalists who want to grow their own dill, it is important to cultivate this herb in warm to hot summers, with plenty of sunshine.

  • Extraction Ratio : 1/4
  • Ingredients: Organic grain alcohol, distilled water,and organic herb.
  • Alcohol Volume: 30%
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ANCIENT TRADITIONS FOR MODERN HEALING